Thursday, June 30, 2005

Power to the people!


Avoiding reality! Posted by Hello

Just liked the image above!

Seems to me it sums up how to avoid reality.

The current pre election posturing of the two main political parties seem to be presenting a debate defined by fixed positions. Both are arguing over how they can best organize the world for us. Trouble is they never seem to ask us what it is we all want. They presume to know on our behalf.

It is all, see no reality, hear no reality and speak no reality.

There is no conversation with the rest of us about what kind of country we want to become as we enter the first decades of the new millennium.

One side wants to return to less government, less taxes and a belief that all will be well. This recipe hasn’t worked in the past – either in the Victorian Era or in the 1990s. The other side wants to make all the decisions for us even though people eventually tire of being left out of being able to make their own decisions. It is 'survival of the fittest' (or greediest) versus 'one size fits all'.

So we end up with this 'either/or' argument and as a result real alternative solutions are never considered.

Traditional state welfare has created welfare dependency without empowering those receiving welfare to take responsibity for themselves. And as well it seems all the money goes to support the endless service organizations which live off the backs of the poor. Conservatives argue against this but seem unable to present an alternative and rely on 'spongy' phrases about money wasted on 'flaky' causes.

Until these fixed positions are broken down, and until politicians really start to listen to the voices of the real people, then this will be our lot.

Somewhere between the faceless state bureaucrats, determining our future with their endless rules, regulations and a compliance mentality that seem to fit no one in particular, and the dream that individuals by themselves can solve the problems themselves, if they were only given their tax money back, there must lie creative alternatives.

My bet would be on reducing the State to negotiate with us all a sense of direction, envoronmtal sustainability, and to provide the basic infrastructure and appropriate regulations ( to protect people from those who only care for their own profit or point of view).They then need to reinvent local community government to provide all the services now currently controlled by the State. We just need new rules to create a new world.

Rather than a universal 'one size fits all' mentality we should value regional diversity and participation by the people in their own destiny. If this were the case there would be lots of regional diversity but this should be seen as a strength. Some ideas will fail while other will succeed and spread to other areas. This is evolution. Most of all this creative decentralization would reinvent local social community responsibity, empower people and revitalize democratic values.

It would create a new environment and a new reality in accord with what we all value.

It would be 'messy' and would not be acceptable to the control freaks on both sides who currently are debating our future. As Shakespeare would have said, ‘a curse on both your houses’. Lets face reality - we are entering a new world.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

'There must be someway out of here,'said the joker to the thief.
'There's too much confusion, I can't get no relief.
Businessmen, they drink my wine, plowmen dig my earth.
None of them along the line know what any of it is worth.'

from 'All Along the Watchtower' by Bob Dylan. Seems appropriate to this context.

Bruce said...

Great quote!

Anonymous said...

The picture looks like Ministry technocrats awaiting the result of the upcoming elections!

Bruce said...

Bet they are in full panic down there!

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Betty Tesh said...

Betty Tesh here with a few hints for New Teachers...

You're going to be a great teacher. You've got knowledge, enthusiasm, desire, motivation. What you don't have is experience.

And experience makes the difference between a potentially great teacher and a comfortably great teacher.

We've got over 68 combined years of experience to share, which is what we've done in...

"The Handy-Dandy Desktop Mentor."

No esoteric teaching methods. No field studies or carefully calibrated experiments. Just down-to-earth, helpful hints and suggestions to help you survive your first (few) years as a teacher.

We warn you about common pitfalls, give suggestions for getting along with fellow teachers, toss out a few classroom management techniques, offer advice on dealing with parents, and share secrets on organizing some of that "stuff" you've suddenly acquired.

If what you want is dull, dry treatise on pedagogy, or if you need a heavy meal of ibids and op.cits laced with quotes from learned professors of education, this book's not for you. It's quick and easy reading, a bit light-hearted, but as serious as an air strike about helping you bet the teacher you know you were meant to be.

A handbook for initially licensed, novice and beginning teachers that shares classroom management ideas, tips for getting along with educational personnel, suggestions for dealing with parents, and advice that good mentoring
teachers share for success in the classroom, written with humor by experienced educators.

As a new teacher, you won’t be doing battle with a supreme Evil like Sauron or traveling into the Cracks of Doom like Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee, but like those two Hobbits, you are ‘expected to find a way...’ (Book IV, Chpt. 3) A way to make learning fun, but keep control of the classroom; a way to reach thirty different children with thirty different learning styles, a way to teach whole-heartedly while fielding a barrage of forms, procedures, expectations and instructions.

"The Handy-Dandy Desktop Mentor." is available at my site for New Teachers.

New Teachers said...

Betty Tesh here with a few hints for New Teachers...

You're going to be a great teacher. You've got knowledge, enthusiasm, desire, motivation. What you don't have is experience.

And experience makes the difference between a potentially great teacher and a comfortably great teacher.

We've got over 68 combined years of experience to share, which is what we've done in...

"The Handy-Dandy Desktop Mentor."

No esoteric teaching methods. No field studies or carefully calibrated experiments. Just down-to-earth, helpful hints and suggestions to help you survive your first (few) years as a teacher.

We warn you about common pitfalls, give suggestions for getting along with fellow teachers, toss out a few classroom management techniques, offer advice on dealing with parents, and share secrets on organizing some of that "stuff" you've suddenly acquired.

If what you want is dull, dry treatise on pedagogy, or if you need a heavy meal of ibids and op.cits laced with quotes from learned professors of education, this book's not for you. It's quick and easy reading, a bit light-hearted, but as serious as an air strike about helping you bet the teacher you know you were meant to be.

A handbook for initially licensed, novice and beginning teachers that shares classroom management ideas, tips for getting along with educational personnel, suggestions for dealing with parents, and advice that good mentoring
teachers share for success in the classroom, written with humor by experienced educators.

As a new teacher, you won’t be doing battle with a supreme Evil like Sauron or traveling into the Cracks of Doom like Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee, but like those two Hobbits, you are ‘expected to find a way...’ (Book IV, Chpt. 3) A way to make learning fun, but keep control of the classroom; a way to reach thirty different children with thirty different learning styles, a way to teach whole-heartedly while fielding a barrage of forms, procedures, expectations and instructions.

"The Handy-Dandy Desktop Mentor." is available at my site for New Teachers.

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